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Primary Care Networks

Building healthy communities – Primary Care Networks

 

What is a Primary Care Network?

Primary Care Networks are made up of groups of GP practices who are working together more closely than ever before with community services, mental health, social care, hospitals and the voluntary sector to improve the services you receive.

The networks aim to bring different providers into one place so that it is easier for you to access the right service to meet your needs, closer to home. There are four in Great Yarmouth and Waveney, which were previously known as localities. They are:

 

Great Yarmouth and Northern Villages Gorleston

Lowestoft

South Waveney

 

From 1 April 2019, the community services provided by East Coast Community Healthcare (ECCH), will be brought into line with these Primary Care Networks. Clinicians based in the community will work closely alongside GP practice staff to provide you with joined-up care.

This means each Primary Care Network with have a team that includes:

 

  • Nurses
  • Physiotherapists
  • Occupational therapists
  • Healthcare assistants
  • Pharmacists
  • Phlebotomists
  • Paramedics
  • Assistant Practitioners
  • Diabetes nurses
  • Social workers

What does this mean for me?

Bringing services together into these networks will help us provide you with better coordinated, more integrated health and social care. Different organisations and teams will share information more effectively, which means that you will only need to tell your story once rather than repeating it every time you see someone new. We will also make sure you receive the right treatment from the right person every time, which will mean you get the best possible outcome from your care.

An Integrated Care Lead will work in each network to break down boundaries and lead the coordination of care between services and organisations/agencies, which means that you will receive seamless services, regardless of who is providing them.

You will also be able to get help to look after yourself and your family, as well as support to self-manage long-term conditions such as diabetes so that you can stay well for longer. Specialist community services, such as  continence care or physiotherapy, will also be available when expert help is needed.

 

Why is this happening?

Working in networks gives us the chance to tailor the services we provide so that they better meet the health needs of local people. This means that if there is an area where a number of patients have the same issue, such as back problems for example, ECCH can arrange additional physiotherapy clinics so that local people can get the help they need without having to travel. This new way of working will also make it easier to signpost people to local support, such as groups for carers or organisations which aim to tackle social isolation.

Demand for health and care services is rising all the time. By working together more closely, we can also improve efficiency and make sure we make the best possible use of the resources we have available while keeping our patients at the heart of everything we do.

 

How will I access care?

You will be able to call one number to access all services. Clinicians will triage your call and make sure that you are referred to the right service to meet your needs, and will also be able to signpost you to local support groups where appropriate.